This week we feature a guest post, courtesy of the Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS).

Kakamega forest is a tiny fragment of tropical rain forest in Western Kenya. It is the easternmost remnant of the Guineo – Congolian rainforest belt that once stretched along the equator across the entire expanse of Africa. Due to this insular status, there is a high level of endemism in both fauna(animals) and flora(plants), which makes it an important biodiversity hot spot in the East African region.

There are 380 recorded species of plants. This includes 60 species of ferns, 150 species of trees and shrubs, and 170 species of flowering plants including 60 species of orchids with 9 species endemic to this forest.

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It still resembles the rainforests of Central and West Africa much more than any other forest type in East Africa.

 

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAMukombero’, or white ginger an endemic species widely believed to have aphrodisiac properties

 

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAflowering plants including 60 species of orchids with 9 species found only in this forest

 

The Forest is famous for its birds, with 367 recorded species, nine of which are endemic.

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe Black-and-white-casqued Hornbill

 

The forest is home to a variety of Wildlife such as Bush Pig, Duikers, Bushbuck, African Clawless Otter, Mongoose, Giant African Water Shrew, Squirrels, Tree Pangolin, Porcupine, Bats and monkeys.

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERABlack and White Colobus monkeys are numerous in the forest

 

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAthe endangered DeBrazza’s monkey found at the isolated Kisere Forest Reserve

 

Insects are abundant and some are quite spectacular, such as Goliath beetles, pink and green Flower Mantis. Particularly well represented groups are ants and beetles. Gastropods, millipedes and spiders are also common.

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The park has numerous colorful butterflies (a recorded 489 species).

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Access – By Road: Access is through the Buyangu gate, 600 metres from main road. On public transport, visitors alight at Kambiri junction. Local ‘boda boda’ cyclists operate from the junction to park. Watch for signpost after 15 km from Kakamega town.

Accommodation – The forest reserve offers a serene atmosphere for both campers and banda accommodation.

For more information you can visit the KWS website. *All photos in this post are courtesy of KWS.

Linked to  Our World Tuesday .

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18 Comments

  1. December 3, 2013 at 5:44 pm — Reply

    So beautiful…
    Muza-chan recently posted…A Japanese Song per Day: Lareine – Whiteness ~Yuki no Kubikazari~My Profile

  2. December 4, 2013 at 10:15 am — Reply

    Gorgeous photos!!!
    2wisemonkeys recently posted…weekly photo challenge: let there be lightMy Profile

  3. December 4, 2013 at 12:44 pm — Reply

    Oh my! Is this Kenya! I think this country has a lot to offer. I haven’t been in Kakamega Forest and i will be looking forward to.
    Jeff recently posted…Traveling on the Cheap: 4 Secrets Travel Agents Don’t Want You to Know AboutMy Profile

  4. December 4, 2013 at 12:49 pm — Reply

    I am truly blown away by the biodiversity of Kakamega Forest. I love the little birds and trees and all of the plants. My granny has a big garden in a small village in Poland and I always go there to smell some flowers and admire the beauty of summer, but 60 species of orchids is just craziness!
    Agness recently posted…A Mini Traveller’s Guide to Thailand’s Culture and CustomsMy Profile

  5. December 4, 2013 at 4:13 pm — Reply

    Your photos make me feel I’m actually there, I can almost hear all the forest noises! 🙂 Would love to visit one day.

  6. December 4, 2013 at 7:30 pm — Reply

    Wow – these shots are spectacular!
    ladyfi recently posted…FrostedMy Profile

  7. December 5, 2013 at 1:34 am — Reply

    What a stunning place, and such beautiful photos. A place for the wish list, that’s for sure.
    Johanna recently posted…Top beaches in south west Australia and Eagle Bay Brewing Co.My Profile

  8. December 5, 2013 at 8:26 pm — Reply

    Sigh of relief…no spider pics in this post! I scrolled quickly past the insects section just in case. 😉 The beaks on those hornbills are no joke! This forest is beautiful and looks like it would be such a peaceful place to explore.
    Dana Carmel @ Time Travel Plans recently posted…5 Places to Volunteer in L.A. for the HolidaysMy Profile

  9. December 6, 2013 at 7:07 pm — Reply

    Looks like an outstanding place to visit – and a bit of a photographer’s dream. Love the bird life.
    Leigh recently posted…A Visit to Rincon de la Vieja National Park in Costa RicaMy Profile

  10. December 7, 2013 at 8:32 am — Reply

    I agree with what Agness said on the incredible diversity of the forest. I especially enjoyed the pictures of the monkey and that frog looks(?) huge!! 🙂
    Mike recently posted…How To Make The Best Gourmet Chicken Salad SandwichMy Profile

  11. December 9, 2013 at 11:22 am — Reply

    Absolutely gorgeous photos. These unique wildlife and orchids are so amazing to se. Orchids are my favorite flowers so this was such a treat to see. Every week you keep making me wish so much to visit Africa.
    Mary {The World Is A Book} recently posted…The Grandeur of the Munich ResidenzMy Profile

  12. Manesha
    December 10, 2013 at 11:34 am — Reply

    Its been a while since I saw a picture of a horn bill, and the owl glaring at the photographer, did he know it was during the day?

  13. December 11, 2013 at 12:29 am — Reply

    Kakemega Forest has an amazing biodiversity. What a wealth of unique vegetation and wildlife. I love all the flowers and birds and butterflies. I hope to make it here somday. Beautiful photos.
    Marisol@TravelingSolemates recently posted…Iceland: The Winter Wonders of Snaefellsnes PeninsulaMy Profile

  14. December 12, 2013 at 10:11 pm — Reply

    Love your photos. That little monkey is so cute!
    Freya Renders recently posted…Meeting Lesimbi, a young Maasai from TanzaniaMy Profile

  15. December 15, 2013 at 12:59 pm — Reply

    These are such beautiful photos. I’d love to explore this forest in person one day. I especially like the pictures of the ginger, the owl and the frogs.
    Michele {Malaysian Meanders} recently posted…128 Hours 55 Minutes of Air Travel in One YearMy Profile

  16. Grace
    December 20, 2013 at 3:20 pm — Reply

    Interesting never seen an hornbill,the first time.beautiful butterflies especially the red one..The photographer amazing job

  17. January 13, 2014 at 7:54 pm — Reply

    Wow amazing pics and what an abundance of wildlife! Love the monkeys!
    Samantha @mytanfeet recently posted…Super Banco – Costa Rica Monopoly with Natural Landmarks Instead of StreetsMy Profile

  18. February 1, 2014 at 8:55 am — Reply

    It is really wow !! to visit here . There are several factors that have attributed to the rapid deterioration of various ecosystems. I am always wait to read more about biodiversity . Thanks

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